Events

Seminar by Dr. Hanna Lee

The risks of changing cryospheric environments on nature and society

Cryosphere is where water is in its solid form. The cryosphere is changing faster than global mean under current and future warming scenarios and has great consequences to the feedback cycles of global climate. Among them, permafrost exists on land and is the only cryospheric environment where people live. Thawing permafrost, therefore, has risks to existing human infrastructure as well as lives of people depending on the landscape. I will present ongoing and future research topics at NORCE Climate related to cryospheric research.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Dr. Øyvind Paasche

How can we tell how glaciers vary over time?

Mountain glaciers are still abundant in high-latitude, high-altitude areas on Earth. Their presence in the landscape, and dynamic behaviour, are intimately linked to the local climate. From observations we know that relatively minor shifts in temperature and precipitation are quickly manifested in the mass balance budget of the glacier, which can result in a glacier advance or retreat. Glaciers are consequently among the most trusted indicators of global climate change and therefore a valued proxy.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Prof. Tore Furevik

Strengthened linkages between Arctic and Asian in boreal winter

I will discuss recent and ongoing works on the warming of the Arctic in boreal winter, most pronounced in the northern Barents and Kara Seas, and its linkages to east asian climate. Coinciding with Arctic surface warm anomalies in recent decades (i.e., 1997–2017), the Siberian high has been significantly intensified. The East Asian jet stream expanded westward, and an apparent Rossby wave has propagated from the Arctic to East Asia, suggesting an atmospheric teleconnection between midlatitudes and Arctic.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Dr. Yumin Moon

Process-oriented diagnostics of tropical cyclones in global climate models

Characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) in global climate models (GCMs) are known to be influenced by details in model configurations, including horizontal resolution and parameterization schemes. Understanding model-to-model differences in TC characteristics is one of the key prerequisites toward reducing uncertainty in future TC activity projections by GCMs. To better understand TC characteristics in GCMs, this study conducts process-level examinations of TC structures in eight different GCM simulations that span a range of horizontal resolutions from 1 to 0.25.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Dr. Megumi Chikamoto

Controlling calcium carbonate preservations during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

Megumi O. Chikamoto (University of Hawaii), Yoshi Chikamoto (Utah State University), Akira Oka (University of Tokyo), and Axel Timmermann (Pusan National University)

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Dr. Elena Xoplaki

Climate impacts and societal resilience in the Mediterranean of the last millennium;
the cases of medieval Byzantium and Ottoman Little Ice Age crisis

We address the possible causal relationships between climatic andsocio-economic change and assess the resilience of the medieval Byzantium and the Little Ice Age Ottoman Empire socio-economic systems in the context of climate change impacts.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Prof. Young-Hyang Park

A key process of the nonstationary relationship between ENSO and the Western Pacific teleconnection pattern

There is intriguing nonstationary relationship between ENSO and the WP teleconnection pattern, with a regime-dependent interdecadal modulation of significant correlations for 1973-1987 (r = 0.68) and insignificant correlations for 1988-2002 (r = 0.14). The subject has nontrivial implications for ascertaining whether the WP is directly forced by ENSO or by midlatitude storm tracks-driven intrinsic processes.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building

Seminar by Prof. Juerg Luterbacher

New evidence on East Asian temperature and hydro-climatic variability over the past two millennia

Palaeoclimatic information provide fundamental means for the characterization of natural decadal to centennial time-scale changes and putting the recent anthropogenic warming in the long-term perspective. Here we present recent advancement in our physical and dynamical understanding of Asian summer temperature variations, trends and extremes over the past 2000 years.

Jasmine - Seminar Room (1010), 10th floor, M Building